November lecture: “Rethinking Andean and Amazonian Relations”

On Thursday, November 17 at 6 pm, Dr. Sonia Alconini (Professor of Anthropology at the University of Virginia) will present “Rethinking Andean and Amazonian Relations: The Taypi Yungas as Spaces of Encounter, Ethnogenesis and Sociopolitical Transformations.” Co-sponsored by the University of Richmond Department of Classical Studies, the free lecture will be held in Jepson Hall 118 on the UR campus.

October lecture postponed

Due to illness, Jack Gary’s lecture scheduled for this Thursday (Oct. 13) has been postponed to a future date, yet to be determined. We wish him a quick recovery and look forward to hosting him at another time. We will post an update here when we know more, and you can join our email list for notifications by using the ‘Contact’ form (accessed through the tab above).

October 13 lecture on new discoveries at Colonial Williamsburg (POSTPONED)

Tags

, ,

Please join us for our first lecture of the academic year (and our first in-person event since Feb. 2020!): on Thursday, October 13 at 6 pm, Jack Gary (Director of Archaeology at Colonial Williamsburg) will present “Restoring Faith: Community Archaeology and the Search for America’s Oldest Black Baptist Church” (click here for recent news coverage of the project). Co-sponsored by the University of Richmond Department of Classical Studies, the free lecture will be held in Jepson Hall 118 on the UR campus.

2022-2023 Lecture Schedule

Free lectures co-sponsored by the University of Richmond Department of Classical Studies

Lectures will be held at 6 pm in 118 Jepson Hall, 221 Richmond Way, Richmond, VA 23173. For directions and parking, see https://www.richmond.edu/visit/.

Thursday, October 13 – Jack Gary (Colonial Williamsburg), “Restoring Faith: Community Archaeology and the Search for America’s Oldest Black Baptist Church” (click here for recent news coverage of the project) [POSTPONED]

Thursday, November 17 Sonia Alconini (University of Virginia), “Rethinking Andean and Amazonian Relations: The Taypi Yungas as Spaces of Encounter, Ethnogenesis and Sociopolitical Transformations”

Thursday, February 8 Chris Motz (University of Richmond), “Connecting Ecology, Economy, and Craft in the Roman Fish-Salting Industry”

Thursday, March 16 – Emilia Oddo (Tulane University), “In case of emergency, break pots: use and function of Marine Style pottery in Minoan Crete”

Thursday, April 13 – Eric Cline (George Washington University), “1177 BC Revisited: Updating the Late Bronze Age Collapse”

AIA SAIG 2nd Annual Dissertation lecture Thursday, May 12, at 6 pm

Though we had to postpone the lecture we had scheduled for this Thursday at 6 pm, you can still catch an archaeology lecture at that time! The AIA Student Affairs Interest Group will host its second annual dissertation lecture on Zoom: Amanda Gaggioli, doctoral candidate at Stanford University, will present “Earthquakes and the Structuring of Greco-Roman Society: the longue durée of human-geological environment relationships in Helike, Greece.” Click here to register!

Spring member event postponed

The lecture by Jack Gary (Colonial Williamsburg) scheduled for May 12 has been postponed to October 13, when we will celebrate International Archaeology Day and Virginia Archaeology Month with our first in-person lecture in more than two years! For our spring gathering, we are planning a social event at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts later this spring/summer – check back here for more information, or click on the ‘Contact’ tab and enter your information to join our email list.

Lecture on April 14: “Coastal Heritage and Climate Change”

Join us on Thursday, April 14 at 6:00 pm for a Zoom lecture by Dr. Leslie Reeder-Myers (Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Temple University), “Coastal Heritage and Climate Change—A Monumental Challenge to Preserve the Past in the 21st Century.”

Click here to register!

Lecture abstract:

Twenty-first century climate change threatens all kinds of cultural heritage—archaeological sites, historic monuments and buildings, traditional subsistence or cultural practices, among many others. This is especially urgent in coastal areas where the triple threat of rising sea level, more powerful coastal storms, and growing coastal populations create a monumental challenge. At the same time, though, people are placing a greater value on cultural heritage and gaining a better understanding of how precarious these resources are. In this talk, I will discuss global efforts to, first, understand the scale of the problem and, second, decide how to address it. Archaeologists cannot overcome this challenge alone, nor is it possible to save everything. We must develop strong community partnerships and think creatively about what is truly valuable in cultural heritage. I will specifically discuss my research in coastal California and the importance of partnering with indigenous communities to decide what matters most in cultural heritage.